The River Tunic-

Sat, Jul 23 2016 10:47
I knew when I couldn't stop making and wearing these....I had to share it with you! You can download it in my online store, or order up a hardcopy to arrive on your doorstep. Either way, I am looking forward to hearing about The River Tunics you make.
Some of the best things we create start from what's around us and a function we need to satisfy. This design started with the realization that, although I love the fabrics...I only wear 1/2 of the scarves in my collection. Scarves seem to be like socks in winter...often times an impulsive buy. Surveying my scarf collection recently, I thought about wearing some of those light-weight fabrics as a garment. Shrugs have happened... but I loved the idea of a tunic that could just be a longer, summer layer.
Check your scarf stash for one to transform into a River Tunic-
It starts with a simple length (scarf or fabric) that gets folded in 2 directions then cut.
So here are some of the ones I have made. I do enjoy tweeking the design and adding details as I go.
Look for the next batch of tunics in future blogs.


Sheer Japanese Cottons are a beautiful choice for the River Tunic. This one from marcytilton.com

Opening this River Tunic down the back, leaves a slit for airflow and a vintage button at the top. I added some single layer strips of sheer mesh at the neck and sleeve ends. Folding the front edge gave the neck edge an asymmetrical line.

hand stitching on the sleeve edges
There can never be to much hand stitching! I like the way the contrasting embroidery thread ties in with the design.
Successful simple garment shapes are ALL ABOUT THE FABRIC & THE SILHOUETTE.
Imagine your new version: Linens and cottons or knits, organzas and sheers....the fabrics you are called to work with define your garment style.
How much Ease do you want? One of the ways to ensure a successful fit is to determine the amount of ease (at the hips and bust) you want for comfort. Measuring the clothes you wear can give a range of ease to work with.
An overall concept to keep in mind when considering volume in garments is: The taller/larger person can wear more fabric (and not look swallowed up). The more petite you are, less fabric is usually more to scale. 

Design Play that will change each tunic you create:
• Cut the hem in an asymmetrical shape.
• Make the armholes deeper and shaped.
• Use hand-printed and accent fabrics for bindings & trim.  
• Create a different neckline or add a collar piece.
• Make a piece of fabric first, then cut out your tunic
• Add patch pockets in contrasting or embroidered fabrics    (vintage tea towels are great for this!)
• Pleat the fabric first, then cut out the tunic
Create your own style by making a collaged piece of fabric for The River Tunic 
BINDING-
Accent bindings and pocket fabric is one of the ideas shared in the pattern instructions. The closeup below is the grey sleeveless tunic version on the pattern cover shown at the top of this blog. Adding bold, contrasting fabric gives it a nice edge.
hand-printed fabric used for binding and pockets-

A neck edge shaped by folding then hand stitched with embroidery floss-
Shaped Neck Edge Tucks & Folds- Cutting a slightly wider neck opening gives the option to add a variety of folds across the shoulder and garment front for design.

WINTER LAYERING Versions- I know I will be sharing some lightweight washed wool versions of this tunic as I create my winter wardrobe. Washed wool, slightly crinkled has a casual appeal and will fit well with leggings and boots this fall.

This green and grey dot version is getting lots of wear....it's the perfect summer dressing with my sheer textured leggings and cropped pants.

Enjoy your summer sewing!  Diane



See More Posts...

Click here for the sitemap showing all past posts.
© 2017 Diane Ericson Contact Diane